A Precious Right We Take For Granted

Oxygen is something we take for granted.  We assume that we will always have it to use any way we want. We believe it will always be there. We even believe we have a right to it.

Truth is, if we didn’t have it, we would not be able to live.

Because many of us have had access to it, we assume voting for our elected officials is something we will always be able to do.  We miss the fact that most of the people born in The United States did not have the right to vote for the people who made laws that govern them.

The people in power created laws like poll taxes and grandfather clauses to limit the number of people who could vote.  They understand the power in picking elected officials.  They used the lack of education and knowledge of the voting rules to keep undesirable people away from the polls. Today they create specialized rules like a prison record or immigration status to deny people the right to vote.  It keeps the few elites in power so that they can become richer and keep undesirables in their place.

You see it has only been a little over 50 years that African Americans had laws in place to protect their right to vote, followed closely by women who gained the right over 80 years ago. Even white men had to start a revolution to gain the right too chose who represented them in government more than 242 years ago.

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These folks had to put their feet to the ground and fight for the right to vote. These men and women who with the sweat of their brows gave up more than we can imagine fighting for something they never attained. They wanted the right to vote. They knew the power it held. But many never got to cast a ballot.

So go and cast your ballot for your ancestors who could not because there were laws in place to keep them from it. Cast your vote for women who marched and protested for 80 years before they had the right to vote.

You have the right. Make some time and do it.

When you give your freedom to someone else, you give up the right to live your life how you want to. You give up the right to be free.

I have spent these days encouraging people to vote because I believe in the right to a free government of the people, by the people, for the people.

 

 

 

 

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Looking For Participants

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The legacies we pass on are the ones that shape our society.  We teach our daughters how to live in a society that does not value women. How are you doing that?  What steps are you taking to ensure that your daughters, granddaughters, nieces and cousins have the tools to be great in a world that does not value them?

I am making a documentary about you.

I am looking for women who are passing on the legacy of marching and protesting in the tradition that gained us the right to vote.

If you are that person or know someone like this contact me at uppcreative@yahoo.com

 

Destiny’s Dilemma

Why did men always show up in twos? Why did she always have to pick?  She hated being home, but the male attention she was getting wasn’t too bad. There was a handsome white gentleman who chased her all over town. then there was a good looking Negro who made her smile every time he showed up. But right in the middle of it, life happened. Zo had to decide would she be a woman of principle or a woman who took what she wanted.  She would have to learn to make their racist intentions work for her.

Destiny’s Dilemma is the book of the month. It is available on Amazon and Books2Read.com

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Ordinary People Changed History

These women changed history.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Nov 18, 1815 to Oct 26, 1902, changed history by joining with a group of women to form a women’s rights group. She did this in 1848 before it was popular and lots of women were involved. She stepped up for what she believed in and spent her life fight for women to have equal rights as citizens of the United States.

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Susan B Anthony Feb 15, 1820 to March 13, 1906, changed history by helping to form many organizations that championed women’s rights.  In 1872 she was arrested and convicted for actually voting in an election.  Anthony and Stanton presented Congress with an amendment that was known as the Susan B Anthony Amendment. It was ratified by Congress as the 20th Amendment in 1920.

IdaBWells

Ida B Wells, July 16, 1862 to March 25, 1931, changed history by documenting lynchings in the United States. She was one of the founding members of the NAACP and an early member of the civil rights movement. Wells had no qualms about offending her white counterparts when she accused them of turning a blind eye racial discrimination while championing rights for women.

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Mary McLeod Bethune July 10, 1875 to May 18, 1955 changed history when she started an African American private school which later became Bethune-Cookman University.  She was also appointed national advisor to Franklin D Roosevelt.

Alice Paul

 

Alice Paul, Jan 11, 1885 to July 9, 1977, changed history by being one of the main leaders of the campaign for the 19th Amendment.  She also worked for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

 

 

Thank you for your support

I want to say Thank You for supporting the Queens project to Bridgette Brown help me tell stories of women like Rosa Louise McCauley Parks, known as the “mother of the freedom movement” was a civil rights activist. She was part of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. She was a secretary for the Montgomery Chapter of the NAACP and later received a Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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Thank you for your support

I want to say Thank You for supporting the Queens project to Crystal Browning. You will help me tell stories of women like Dolores Huerta who was a labor leader and civil rights activist. A former girl scout and teacher, Huerta co founded the Agricultural Workers Association which set up voter registration drives. She directed the United Farm Workers national boycott of grapes taking the worker’s plight to the public.

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