Everyone Has A Story To Tell

Now is the time to write that book that has been in you. It has been brewing you.  You have been toying with the idea of putting it on paper. It is time to share your story and help someone else on the journey.


We were created to share our lives with others to help them along the journey.  I have a short time to help someone bring their project together.  Contact me and see if you are a good candidate for this.  If you are interested email me at uppcreative@yahoo.com


Ordinary People Changed History

These women changed history.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Nov 18, 1815 to Oct 26, 1902, changed history by joining with a group of women to form a women’s rights group. She did this in 1848 before it was popular and lots of women were involved. She stepped up for what she believed in and spent her life fight for women to have equal rights as citizens of the United States.


Susan B Anthony Feb 15, 1820 to March 13, 1906, changed history by helping to form many organizations that championed women’s rights.  In 1872 she was arrested and convicted for actually voting in an election.  Anthony and Stanton presented Congress with an amendment that was known as the Susan B Anthony Amendment. It was ratified by Congress as the 20th Amendment in 1920.


Ida B Wells, July 16, 1862 to March 25, 1931, changed history by documenting lynchings in the United States. She was one of the founding members of the NAACP and an early member of the civil rights movement. Wells had no qualms about offending her white counterparts when she accused them of turning a blind eye racial discrimination while championing rights for women.


Mary McLeod Bethune July 10, 1875 to May 18, 1955 changed history when she started an African American private school which later became Bethune-Cookman University.  She was also appointed national advisor to Franklin D Roosevelt.

Alice Paul


Alice Paul, Jan 11, 1885 to July 9, 1977, changed history by being one of the main leaders of the campaign for the 19th Amendment.  She also worked for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.



Goodbye Black History, Hello Women’s History

I love history. This country is filled with incredible stories of human beings who did incredible things during trying times. They were ordinary people who stood up for what was right.  Many did not get to see the fruit of their labor, but they tended the garden anyway.

It is what we need: People who will tend to the garden even though they don’t get to eat the harvest.

Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass fought to change minds about the evils of slavery from the midst of it.  They lived to see the end of slavery, but the true liberation of their people escaped them.  Tubman helped free slaves one person at a time with the Underground Railroad. Douglass wrote books and gave speeches on the evils of slavery after having escaped from his master.

Because of the work done by Tubman and Douglass, Ida Wells and James Baldwin were able to get an education. Baldwin grew up in Harlem where he was able to attend public school and began a literary career.  Wells, one of the founders of the NAACP, was a graduate of Fisk University. She was also a journalist and suffragist.  Both continued to be a  voice of the movement.

A Georgia minister became the spokesperson for that movement in the 1950s.   Dr. Martin Luther King lead boycotts and organized nonviolent protests in the southern part of the United States. Even though he won a Novel Peace Prize, he did not see the fruit of his labor. But he tended the garden cause he knew fruit was coming.

Barack Obama was the 44th President of the United States.  In the face of radical racism, he lead the country in a way that was true to the people who came before him.  Like the slaves who came before him, he was attacked in every  manner, but like cream, rose to the top. His wife, Michelle, set a new standard for what a First Lady is able to accomplish during their time in office.

Black History lives and breathes.

Welcome the stories of women.

Alice Paul was one of the women who lead the campaign for the 19th Amendment.

Delores Huerta is a Latina who co founded the National Farmerworkers Association and a civil rights activist.

Sojourner Truth was an abolitionists and former slave who also contributed to the women’s movement.

Ida B Wells was a journalist and activist who was not afraid to take on racist white women who hindered the women’t movement.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was an abolitionist and suffragist who helped co found the women’s right movement.

Susan B Anthony was an abolitionist and suffragist who helped arrange for the U.S. Congress to be presented with the amendment giving women the right to vote.

Again, these women tended the garden, but didn’t eat the fruit.


The Route Might Be Clear


I stood at this sign over a month ago. It was one of those fun photos you take when you are on a girl’s trip.  You are on Route 66, the historical highway and it seems like the possibilities are endless. It was fun.


A month later I am standing on Michigan Ave and I see this sign. Wow.  It didn’t even hit me where I was or how crazy cool it was to there.  I had been invited to an on campus interview at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago for a graduate program. It was an honor to be there and talk about the possibilities.


Chicago has a different vibe from the city where I currently live.  There was a moment when it started snowing.  Instead of the panic that insues in my part of the country, folks walked around taking pictures. We walked around taking pictures.


All of this to say, God has incredible things planned for your life, you just got to Trust Him.  It is God when it is something that you can’t do on your own or with the help of your people.  Where is He leading you in 2018? There is lots of work to do, lets get to it.





Black History Month

To celebrate Black History Month, I am going to share some African American History moments with you throughout the month.  I love history because it is like a present in a wrapped box. You shake it and think you know what it is. You unwrap it and find out it is something altogether different.  Prepare to learn and be entertained this month.

Black History Month

Each week, I will give away one of my books. the first book, Destiny’s Dilemma, is perfect because it is a historical fiction set in 1912 Fort Worth, Texas. Checkout Facebook, Twitter and Instagram on Monday to see how you can win a copy.  There are also copies available if you want to purchase a printed copy for $10.


Today I learned about an African Latina woman, Anita Scott Coleman.  She was a writer during the Harlem Renaissance, but never lived in Harlem. She lived in New Mexico and California.

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Here is a link to more information about this amazing woman.


Knowing What You Are Called To Do

Have you ever had someone say something you know, but once they say it it actually becomes clear? What I love about my relationship with God is that  He doesn’t just say something to me, He gives me a full 3D experience to make sure I get it.

The speaker said “We are not called to be successful. We are called to be obedient.”

This word encouraged me to the point I almost shouted right there! God used my whole weekend to make this point.

Sometimes when we are doing things we were called to do we have a goal in mind, but it is not the same goal as God’s.  There is a feeling that if He calls me to it, He is going to make me successful in it. Sometimes all He wants from us is to show up. We assume that He calls us to places to win the big prize or make the big deal.

Saturday started with me finishing last in a 5K.  I mean the very last person to walk across the finish line. When I finally caught up with the police officer  who managed the traffic for the race, I asked if he was afraid I was going to jump on his bike and ask for a ride because he pulled off everytime I got close. He laughed and went on home.  I kept walking. I finished the race. (Now I wasn’t trying to win, but I later learned that I was not called to be successful, just to be obedient.) Somedays it is about us showing up.

2018 5K

No matter how many things are on my agenda for the day I still have to manage my business. Later that evening I sat down with my marketing plan and saw there were some holes in it.  Usually, I would get frustrated and chuck it. I would look for something else or contact a consultant.  But I came to a better understanding that I was not called to be successful, just obedient.  Somedays it is about showing up.

This statement reminds me that God’s plan doesn’t look like man’s plans.  As long as I am obedient, I am moving in the right direction. My obedience is success in God’s plan. You have to learn to listen to God and not all the people around you sending you in the wrong direction.

BSF 2018 3

Finally, this evening as I was standing in a hallway, I watched a little boy have a melt down while the adults around him didn’t know what to do. The adult in me said leave those people alone, I don’t have a dog in this hunt. But the Holy Spirit who is quite familiar with me, said you know what needs to happen.

So his father put the little boy down after I asked if we could pray.  After seven years as a children’s leader, you know how to listen for the Spirit speaking to you.  You see this morning the pastor taught us that we are all in a struggle and God is waiting to rescue us.  We just have to give Him our struggles.

I don’t know if the little one will understand what we prayed for, but I know that success was not my goal. It was being obedient to the Holy Spirit. The God I love gave me all of these expereinces that mean one thing on earth, but something different in heaven. This will be a year of letting the outcomes go.  You see He didn’t call me to be successful. He called me to be obedient.

1 Samuel 15:22






15, 16 and 17

Let me warn you now, any good you see in me is really Christ because there is no good in me except for Him.


15. I did not set out to do this, but as I looked back on it, I have to say I am impressed with God.  I did stuff for others and required nothing in return.  Atleast once a quarter I donated blood or platelets. It may have been more because sometimes  went when they called. But atleast once a quarter I gave so someone else could benefit.  This year I also reached out to my friends and we raised money for a family that adopted 4 children into their family of five.

16.  I learned to do new things on social media.  I started sharing my art on Instagram. It challenges me to see the world differently and use the things I learn. It makes me tell a story in a few shots.

I.love.twitter. There are some of the most wittiest and clever people I have never met. But there are also some of the most stupidiest. I have found hope and joy in the words of others. I have found laughter that almost stops my breathing. And I relish the moments I can join the fight.  There is absolutely nothing like when twitter goes in on a person. ( If they ever go in on you, shut up. Do not respond you will only feed the fire.) i.love.twitter.


17. I took some great photos this year and surpassed my goal. There was a good combination of families, individuals and events.  They all made me look good. Thank you.

Doing 17 things that I had not done before was not easy. Sometimes it was really hard to do things differently or step out of my comfort zone. I had to think about what I was doing because it is easy to do the same things you are comfortable with, but what does that really get you.  What new thing are you learning? How are you stretching your current skill set? Since next year ends in 18, there will be 18 different things on my list. I look forward to what the year brings.

I challenge you to look for 18 new things to do next year. As you accomplish these things, take a photo and share it with us.

Peace and Hairgrease.