Quote

Harriet Jacobs was an African-American writer whose autobiography, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, published in 1861 under the pseudonym Linda Brent, is now considered an “American classic”. Born into slavery in Edenton, North Carolina, in Feb of 1811 she was sexually harassed by her enslaver. She was the first woman to write a fugitive slave narrative.

https://docsouth.unc.edu/fpn/jacobs/bio.html

Art of the Quarter

By the 1600 they were all participating in the slave trade, English, French, Spanish.  They were spreading it as they tried to expand their borders.

They called her Angela and she was one of the first women of African descent to land at Jamestown in 1619. In 1622 lived through the attack of Native Americans.  In 1625 she is listed as a Negro woman living in the household of Captain William Pierce. They do not think she was an indentured servant, but was probably made to serve indefinitely.

Angela was Angolan from the Ndongo Kingdom who had been capture in her native land and taken aboard the San Juan Bautista. The ship was headed to Veracruz, Mexico but some English privateers captured it. They split the enslaved individuals and went on their way.

Angela was brought to Jamestown a ship called the Treasurer. She was captured because she has a skillset that would make the owners a profit.

Don Miguel de Castro was an ambassador from the Kingdom of Congo in the 1600s. He travelled to Europe and South America representing the interest of the Congo. He was also a cousin to the Count of Sonho, a province in Angola.

A portrait was painted of him in 1643, one of 20 commissioned. Some of which ended up in the National Gallery of Denmark.

Nzinga Mbande (c. 1583 – 1663) was Queen of the Ambundu Kingdoms of Ndongo (1624–1663) and Matamba (1631–1663), located in present-day northern Angola. Born into the ruling family of Ndongo, Nzinga received military and political training as a child, and she demonstrated an aptitude for defusing political crises as an ambassador to the Portuguese Empire.

In 1624, Ana Nzinga inherited rule of Ndongo, a state to the east of Luanda populated primarily by Mbundu peoples. At that moment, the kingdom was under attack from both Portuguese as well as neighboring African aggressors. Nzinga realized that, to remain viable, Ndongo had to reposition itself as an intermediary rather than a supply zone in the slave trade. To achieve this, she allied Ndongo with Portugal, simultaneously acquiring a partner in its fight against its African enemies and ending Portuguese slave raiding in the kingdom.

Martín de Porres Velázquez OP was a Peruvian lay brother of the Dominican Order who was beatified in 1837 by Pope Gregory XVI and canonized in 1962 by Pope John XXIII. He is the patron saint of mixed-race people, barbers, innkeepers, public health workers, and all those seeking racial harmony.

Martin was born in the city of Lima, Viceroyalty of Peru, on 9 December 1579. He was the illegitimate son of a Spanish nobleman, Don Juan de Porras y de la Peña, and Ana Velázquez, a freed slave of African and Native descent. He had a sister named Juana de Porres, born two years later in 1581. After the birth of his sister, the father abandoned the family. Ana Velázquez supported her children by taking in laundry. He grew up in poverty and, when his mother could not support him, Martin was sent to a primary school for two years, and then placed with a barber/surgeon to learn the medical arts.

The Castillo de San Marcos is the oldest masonry fort in the continental United States; it is located on the western shore of Matanzas Bay in the city of St. Augustine, Florida. Originally built of wood by the Spanish, it was later created as a stone fortress in 1672. In 1687 enslaved people from the Carolinas would escape to fort because the Spanish would free them and give them jobs.

https://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/news/nation/2019/10/16/slaverys-history-angela-first-recorded-african-woman-jamestown/3895860002/

A Fistful of Shells, Toby Green

https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/pwmn_2/hd_pwmn_2.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_de_Porres

https://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/american_latino_heritage/castillo_de_san_marcos_national_monument.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castillo_de_San_Marcos

Book of the Quarter

Connections

In this adventure thriller, Connections, Sandy and her best friend found missing relatives, spied on cheating spouses and caught a few bail jumpers. This private investigator never imagined the bad guys would chase her.
Running for her life, Sandy Herrick discovered that God was the only one with her who wasn’t talking smack, trying to kill her or get into her pants. As she and her friends try to figure out who framed them, they all discover that there was more to each other than they thought they knew.
As evil forces closed in on them, they have to determine who they trust and what they believe about each other. Would this be enough to save them?

Available on Amazon.com

or Books2Read.com

Quote

Solomon Northup (born July 10, c. 1807 or 1808) was an American abolitionist and the primary author of the memoir Twelve Years a Slave. A free-born African American from New York, he was the son of a freed slave and a free woman of color. A farmer and a professional violinist, Northup had been a landowner in Washington County, New York. In 1841, he was offered a traveling musician’s job and went to Washington, D.C. (where slavery was legal); there he was drugged, kidnapped, and sold as a slave. He was shipped to New Orleans, purchased by a planter, and held as a slave for 12 years in the Red River region of Louisiana, mostly in Avoyelles Parish. He remained a slave until he met Samuel Bass, a Canadian working on his plantation who helped get word to New York, where state law provided aid to free New York citizens who had been kidnapped and sold into slavery. His family and friends enlisted the aid of the Governor of New York, Washington Hunt, and Northup regained his freedom on January 3, 1853. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solomon_Northup

Art of the Quarter

By the 1600 they were all participating in the slave trade, English, French, Spanish.  They were spreading it as they tried to expand their borders.

They called her Angela and she was one of the first women of African descent to land at Jamestown in 1619. In 1622 lived through the attack of Native Americans.  In 1625 she is listed as a Negro woman living in the household of Captain William Pierce. They do not think she was an indentured servant, but was probably made to serve indefinitely.

Angela was Angolan from the Ndongo Kingdom who had been capture in her native land and taken aboard the San Juan Bautista. The ship was headed to Veracruz, Mexico but some English privateers captured it. They split the enslaved individuals and went on their way.

Angela was brought to Jamestown a ship called the Treasurer. She was captured because she has a skillset that would make the owners a profit.

Don Miguel de Castro was an ambassador from the Kingdom of Congo in the 1600s. He travelled to Europe and South America representing the interest of the Congo. He was also a cousin to the Count of Sonho, a province in Angola.

A portrait was painted of him in 1643, one of 20 commissioned. Some of which ended up in the National Gallery of Denmark.

Nzinga Mbande (c. 1583 – 1663) was Queen of the Ambundu Kingdoms of Ndongo (1624–1663) and Matamba (1631–1663), located in present-day northern Angola. Born into the ruling family of Ndongo, Nzinga received military and political training as a child, and she demonstrated an aptitude for defusing political crises as an ambassador to the Portuguese Empire.

In 1624, Ana Nzinga inherited rule of Ndongo, a state to the east of Luanda populated primarily by Mbundu peoples. At that moment, the kingdom was under attack from both Portuguese as well as neighboring African aggressors. Nzinga realized that, to remain viable, Ndongo had to reposition itself as an intermediary rather than a supply zone in the slave trade. To achieve this, she allied Ndongo with Portugal, simultaneously acquiring a partner in its fight against its African enemies and ending Portuguese slave raiding in the kingdom.

Martín de Porres Velázquez OP was a Peruvian lay brother of the Dominican Order who was beatified in 1837 by Pope Gregory XVI and canonized in 1962 by Pope John XXIII. He is the patron saint of mixed-race people, barbers, innkeepers, public health workers, and all those seeking racial harmony.

Martin was born in the city of Lima, Viceroyalty of Peru, on 9 December 1579. He was the illegitimate son of a Spanish nobleman, Don Juan de Porras y de la Peña, and Ana Velázquez, a freed slave of African and Native descent. He had a sister named Juana de Porres, born two years later in 1581. After the birth of his sister, the father abandoned the family. Ana Velázquez supported her children by taking in laundry. He grew up in poverty and, when his mother could not support him, Martin was sent to a primary school for two years, and then placed with a barber/surgeon to learn the medical arts.

https://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/news/nation/2019/10/16/slaverys-history-angela-first-recorded-african-woman-jamestown/3895860002/

A Fistful of Shells, Toby Green

https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/pwmn_2/hd_pwmn_2.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_de_Porres

Book of the Quarter

Connections

In this adventure thriller, Connections, Sandy and her best friend found missing relatives, spied on cheating spouses and caught a few bail jumpers. This private investigator never imagined the bad guys would chase her.
Running for her life, Sandy Herrick discovered that God was the only one with her who wasn’t talking smack, trying to kill her or get into her pants. As she and her friends try to figure out who framed them, they all discover that there was more to each other than they thought they knew.
As evil forces closed in on them, they have to determine who they trust and what they believe about each other. Would this be enough to save them?

Available on Amazon.com

or Books2Read.com