Art of the Month

For Black History Month we are telling the story of a woman who started with nothing, but didn’t allow that to hinder her. She pushed on.

Madam C.J. Walker was an African American entrepreneur, philanthropist, and political and social activist. She is recorded as the first female self-made millionaire in America in the Guinness Book of World Records. 

She was born Sarah Breedlove in December 23, 1867 in Delta, Louisiana.

Walker made her fortune by developing and marketing a line of cosmetics and hair care products for black women through the business she founded, Madam C. J. Walker Manufacturing Company. She became known also for her philanthropy and activism. She made financial donations to numerous organizations such as the NAACP, and became a patron of the arts. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madam_C._J._Walker

Art of the Month

He was called Estevanico “Little Stephen” by history, but perhaps his given name was Mustafa. He born free in the Moroccan city of Azemmouri between 1490 and 1500. His faith was probably Muslim, which meant he probably knew how to read and write. As a young man, he was taken captive by slavers and sold to a Spanish nobleman, which meant he had to learn the language of Spanish and maybe even Portuguese.

He was taken on a expedition to conquer the new world in 1527, but things went terribly wrong. Of the 600 men who set out on the journey only 4 made it, and he was one of them.

Estevanico and his fellow travelers had to journey across North America from Tampa Bay coast along the Gulf to South Texas. They were captured by Natives and enslaved for almost six years. He worked as the interpreter, because he knew how to learn languages and communicate with people who were different than him.

At one point they escaped from the natives and made a two-year journey to Mexico posing as spiritual healers for Native Americans. He was known to wear feathers like the natives and carry a gord as a rattle. Once they made it to the Spanish colony in Mexico, life went back to usual, where Estevanico was once again a slave at the will of the others.

The explorers were still looking for gold but were too afraid to go themselves, so his owner lent Estevanico to a friar and sent him back out to explore North America in search for gold.

Legend has it that Estevanico died in his encounter with the Zuni natives in modern day New Mexico, but no body was ever found. By 1539 he was assumed dead because none of the Europeans ever saw him again.

Art of the Month

He was called Estevanico “Little Stephen” by history, but perhaps his given name was Mustafa. He born free in the Moroccan city of Azemmouri between 1490 and 1500. His faith was probably Muslim, which meant he probably knew how to read and write. As a young man, he was taken captive by slavers and sold to a Spanish nobleman, which meant he had to learn the language of Spanish and maybe even Portuguese.

He was taken on a expedition to conquer the new world in 1527, but things went terribly wrong. Of the 600 men who set out on the journey only 4 made it, and he was one of them.

Estevanico and his fellow travelers had to journey across North America from Tampa Bay coast along the Gulf to South Texas. They were captured by Natives and enslaved for almost six years. He worked as the interpreter, because he knew how to learn languages and communicate with people who were different than him.

At one point they escaped from the natives and made a two-year journey to Mexico posing as spiritual healers for Native Americans. He was known to wear feathers like the natives and carry a gord as a rattle. Once they made it to the Spanish colony in Mexico, life went back to usual, where Estevanico was once again a slave at the will of the others.

The explorers were still looking for gold but were too afraid to go themselves, so his owner lent Estevanico to a friar and sent him back out to explore North America in search for gold.

Legend has it that Estevanico died in his encounter with the Zuni natives in modern day New Mexico, but no body was ever found. By 1539 he was assumed dead because none of the Europeans ever saw him again.

Art of the Month

Estevanico worked as a spiritual healer as he traveled among the natives. He carried a red gord that rattled and wore feathers.

He was called Estevanico “Little Stephen” by history, but perhaps his given name was Mustafa. He born free in the Moroccan city of Azemmouri between 1490 and 1500. His faith was probably Muslim, which meant he probably knew how to read and write. As a young man, he was taken captive by slavers and sold to a Spanish nobleman, which meant he had to learn the language of Spanish and maybe even Portuguese.

He was taken on a expedition to conquer the new world in 1527, but things went terribly wrong. Of the 600 men who set out on the journey only 4 made it, and he was one of them.

Estevanico and his fellow travelers had to journey across North America from Tampa Bay coast along the Gulf to South Texas. They were captured by Natives and enslaved for almost six years. He worked as the interpreter, because he knew how to learn languages and communicate with people who were different than him.

At one point they escaped from the natives and made a two-year journey to Mexico posing as spiritual healers for Native Americans. He was known to wear feathers like the natives and carry a red gord as a rattle. Once they made it to the Spanish colony in Mexico, life went back to usual, where Estevanico was once again a slave at the will of the others.

The explorers were still looking for gold but were too afraid to go themselves, so his owner lent Estevanico to a friar and sent him back out to explore North America in search for gold.

Legend has it that Estevanico died in his encounter with the Zuni natives in modern day New Mexico, but no body was ever found. By 1539 he was assumed dead because none of the Europeans ever saw him again.

Art of the Month

Each month I will focus on a person from African history and through out the month tell their story in four images. This is a work in progress, so it will change as we grow.

He was called Estevanico “Little Stephen” by history, but perhaps his given name was Mustafa. He born free in the Moroccan city of Azemmouri between 1490 and 1500. His faith was probably Muslim, which meant he probably knew how to read and write. As a young man, he was taken captive by slavers and sold to a Spanish nobleman, which meant he had to learn the language of Spanish and maybe even Portuguese.

He was taken on a expedition to conquer the new world in 1527, but things went terribly wrong. Of the 600 men who set out on the journey only 4 made it, and he was one of them.

Estevanico and his fellow travelers had to journey across North America from Tampa Bay coast along the Gulf to South Texas. They were captured by Natives and enslaved for almost six years. He worked as the interpreter, because he knew how to learn languages and communicate with people who were different than him.

At one point they escaped from the natives and made a two-year journey to Mexico posing as spiritual healers for Native Americans. He was known to wear feathers like the natives and carry a gord as a rattle. Once they made it to the Spanish colony in Mexico, life went back to usual, where Estevanico was once again a slave at the will of the others.

The explorers were still looking for gold but were too afraid to go themselves, so his owner lent Estevanico to a friar and sent him back out to explore North America in search for gold.

Legend has it that Estevanico died in his encounter with the Zuni natives in modern day New Mexico, but no body was ever found. By 1539 he was assumed dead because none of the Europeans ever saw him again.

Art of the Quarter

Black Lives Matter

BlackLivesMatter was founded in 2013 in response to the acquittal of Trayvon Martin’s murderer. Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation, Inc. is a global organization in the US, UK, and Canada, whose mission is to eradicate white supremacy and build local power to intervene in violence inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes. By combating and countering acts of violence, creating space for Black imagination and innovation, and centering Black joy, we are winning immediate improvements in our lives.

https://blacklivesmatter.com/about/

George Perry Floyd Jr. 

George Perry Floyd Jr. (October 14, 1973 – May 25, 2020) was an African-American man who was murdered by a police officer in Minneapolis, Minnesota, during an arrest made after a store clerk suspected Floyd may have used a counterfeit twenty-dollar bill, on May 25, 2020. Derek Chauvin, one of the four police officers who arrived on the scene, knelt on Floyd’s neck and back for 9 minutes and 29 seconds which caused a lack of oxygen.[4] After his murder, protests against police brutality, especially towards black people, quickly spread across the United States and globally. His dying words, “I can’t breathe,” became a rallying slogan.

Born in Fayetteville, North Carolina, Floyd grew up in Houston, Texas, playing American football and basketball throughout high school and college.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Floyd

Juneteenth

Juneteenth is a federal holiday in the United States commemorating the emancipation of enslaved African Americans. Deriving its name from combining “June” and “nineteenth”, it is celebrated on the anniversary of General Order No. 3, issued by Major General Gordon Granger on June 19, 1865, proclaiming freedom for slaves in Texas. Originating in Galveston, Juneteenth has since been observed annually in various parts of the United States, often broadly celebrating African-American culture. The day was first recognized as a federal holiday in 2021, when President Joe Biden signed the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act into law after the efforts of Lula Briggs Galloway, Opal Lee, and others.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juneteenth

Vice President Kamala Harris

Kamala Devi Harris born October 20, 1964 in Oakland, California. Harris graduated from Howard University and the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. She is an American politician and attorney who is the 49th vice president of the United States. Harris met her husband, attorney Doug Emhoff, through a mutual friend who set up Harris and Emhoff on a blind date in 2013

Harris is the first female vice president and the highest-ranking female official in U.S. history, as well as the first African American and first Asian American vice president. A member of the Democratic Party, she previously served as the attorney general of California from 2011 to 2017 and as a United States senator representing California from 2017 to 2021.

She began her career in the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office, before being recruited to the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office and later the City Attorney of San Francisco’s office.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kamala_Harris

Associate Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson

Ketanji Onyika Brown Jackson wasborn September 14, 1970 in Washington, DC. Jackson is an American jurist who serves as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. She was nominated to the Supreme Court by President Joe Biden on February 25, 2022. She was confirmed by the United States Senate on April 7, 2022, and sworn into office on June 30.

Jackson grew up in the Miami, Florida, area. Jackson graduated from Harvard in 1992 with an A.B. magna cum laude. Jackson worked as a staff reporter and researcher for Time magazine from 1992 to 1993, then attended Harvard Law School. In 1996, Brown married surgeon Patrick Graves Jackson, whom she met at Harvard College. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ketanji_Brown_Jackson

Book of the Quarter

How To Raise God Wise Kids In A Satan Rich World

In a world that can seem hopeless, kids need a reason to hope. In addition to teaching our children how to get into college, play sports and chase the American Dream, there is something greater to be learned. He created the universe with stars and planets, yet the desire of His heart was to reconcile with people whom He loved. In this devotional, the author shares ideas of how to help your children have a personal relationship with God. Through scripture, art and stories, she shared the opportunities she had to teach her own child to get to know God.

Available on Amazon or Books2Read.com

From Season 1

Episode 6 is about the Queens

In this week’s episode, the Sistahs talk about The No 1 Ladies Detective Agency and Queen Sono which are two shows that have strong African characters in the lead. These shows have women in nontraditional roles and showcase the beautiful land of Botswana and South Africa.

Listen The Queens