They Moved On Up

In this episode of TV Talk with the Sistas, they discuss how a show like the Jeffersons not only entertained us but gave us a role model. They also talk about another great African American role model, from the Netflix limited series, Self Made about Madam CJ Walker.

You can listen here Episode 3 Movin On Up

Where We Started

We are sisters. We watch television. We talk about it. TV Talk With the Sistas is a podcast that celebrates African American culture. In our second episode, we examine one of our favorite shows, In the Heat of the Night with its groundbreaking stories and lead African American actors. We compare it with another one of our shows from across the pond, The Crown.

the Show Episode 2 Queen and Country

If We Don’t Tell Our Stories No One Will Know

When I am scrolling through movies, sometimes I take a chance. The other night I took a chance and had no clue what I watching and went wow. I love history but remember that it is written by the ones who win. They tend to leave out the things that embarasses them.

The storyline is around the potato famine in Ireland. It spoke to me of an oppression I could not fathom. The images stuck with me. It gave me a new perspective.

It tells the story of an Irishman who comes home from fighting for the British to find his world decimated. He sets out to get revenge. The cinematography was beautiful. The characters did not disappoint. It told a story.

This movie re enforced the idea of people telling their own story. Our histories have to be told by people who care about them.

I dove into a history that I did not know, yet a small portion of my history is Irish, perhaps the ones who landed in Texas in 1850s. Now I have an idea of what they left behind.

Not An Ordinary Horror Movie

If I watch a movie outside of my favorite genres it is because of the story or the actors involved in the project. I don’t watch horror, but the storyline got me.

And let me tell you this is what I thought a horror movie by African Americans would look like. Bad Hair. The story of a haunted hair weave.

The entire premise is funny as hell, but it also speaks on many levels about the pain we African American women have endured for the sake of our hair.

This movie was interesting and creepy at the same time, but the storyline was fascinating. Elle Lorraine (Insecure) lead us through the story where her hair weave becomes a monster and kills people. This hair, which at one time was the desire of women because it gave them a fake beauty, opened doors to African American women for its straight and silky feature. Well in this film, it kills.

This movie has funny moments, scary moments and ones that cause you to think. I flinched many times and it had nothing to do with monsters, it was a comb being pulled through tangled hair. Not to mention that opening scene where the young woman has perm in her hair and its burning. Ahhh!

These folks understand what terrifies an African American woman about her hair. I won’t be adding this genre to my list of favorites, but this storyline has given me some moments. I wouldn’t watch it the night before my hair appointment. LOL.